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Project Help and Ideas » Nerdkits on a QFP chip

May 14, 2013
by scootergarrett
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So in the future I would like to shrink projects and make PCB’s so I bought some TQFPs , but it’s necessary to boot load this and program before permanently soldering. So I saw what this person did and decided to make my own TQFP socket break out. This requires this part and de-soldering it from its board (I know $25 for something that you just rip apart). I used eagle to make a PBC and a PCB mill at school to cut it out. I already soldered it and taped it to some cardboard so here is a web picture of what the bottom looked like. And here are some pictures of bootloading. Bootloading forum page Bootload setup, new bootload wd. Also I made a Circuit Lab of the TQFP

Thanks to Noter for the bootload info and rieyporter for the TQFP socket idea. If you have any questions or want the eagle files just post.

May 15, 2013
by Ralphxyz
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"but it’s necessary to boot load this and program before permanently soldering."

Why?

Doesn't the ICSP pinout exist on the TQFP's?

Ralph

May 15, 2013
by scootergarrett
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Ya I'm just thinking if I want to make a small PCB that just dose data logging how would I wire it up to boot load with out making the PCB more complex. So this socket holds the chip without needing to solder it so it can be programed before soldering to a specialized PCB. dose that make sense? I think what I'm doing is necessary, nevertheless its fun I get to put chips in the socket with tweeters.

May 15, 2013
by Ralphxyz
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Yeah that makes sense it saves some real estate but I would always want to update a program so a ICSP header would be on all of my PCB's.

"nevertheless its fun I get to put chips in the socket with tweeters."

It is fun, I had a Atmel STK600 that could program every mcu that Atmel will ever make.

It uses socket cards to program the different mcus.

Too bad it died after 3 months use.

Ralph

May 15, 2013
by scootergarrett
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Its easiest to boot load it in the socket because the wiring is in a different configuration, and that only needs to happen once.

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