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Microcontroller Programming » Error when trying to load program into LED ARRAY

March 02, 2010
by tjones88
tjones88's Avatar

I am a windows user and here is what it says when after I navigate to the proper folder and type "make" in the cmd. avrdude -c avr109 -p m168 -b 115200 -P /COM5 -U flash:w:ledarray.hex:a

Connecting to programmer: . Found programmer: Id = ""; type = Software Version = . ; Hardware Version = . avrdude: error: buffered memory access not supported. Maybe it isn't a butterfly/AVR109 but a AVR910 device? make: *** [ledarray-upload] Error 1

March 03, 2010
by pbfy0
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I think that means that the chip isn't in programming mode.

March 03, 2010
by Rick_S
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That error can be caused by several things and essentially says that avrdude cannot communicate with the chip for some reason.

The first thing I noticed was your com port callout. You have "-P /COM5"

Try removing the slash mark from before the COM5 in your make file and see if it works. Verify that com5 is in fact the com port your programming cable is connected to.

After all that has been checked and fixed, if it still doesn't work, check all connections for power and ground to the chip. Check the switch at pin 14 and the ground wire going to the switch. Check the power wire going to pin 1. Verify your programmer is connected properly to pins 2 & 3.

Then unpulg the power from your chip. Slide the switch to program mode, and then re-connect your power. If you built the kit to display the "Congratulations" message, the lcd will typically display 2 black horizontal lines when the chip is in program mode.

At this point try again to program and let us know the results.

Posting a good overhead photo of your board can sometimes help as well if this doesn't get you going.

Good luck!!


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