NerdKits - electronics education for a digital generation

You are not logged in. [log in]

NEW: Learning electronics? Ask your questions on the new Electronics Questions & Answers site hosted by CircuitLab.

Basic Electronics » Multimeter!

April 16, 2009
by strelzj
strelzj's Avatar

I purchased a multimeter from the nerdkits store (I like supporting these guys) which was delivered today. I was excited to learn how to use it except the instructions are in Chinese. I sent a support email regarding this issue and I will post the response just in case anyone encounters the same problem. If someone can help it is gladly appreciated =D.

April 16, 2009
by strelzj
strelzj's Avatar

Okay. As per mike: "Take a look at: http://www.nerdkits.com/files/A830L.pdf This isn't for this exact model -- there are a few ranges that are missing or different maximums -- but the basic instructions are right."

April 16, 2009
by ranger
ranger's Avatar

Props for supporting nerdkits!

I should probably read up on my multimeter... all I've used it for is voltage readings on wall outlets (while rewiring our house).

April 16, 2009
by n3ueaEMTP
n3ueaEMTP's Avatar

Strelzj, I agree with you, I have been in need of more MCUs for a project that I build. I thought about buying them direct from the manufacturer and load them myself but then I thought about all the FREE tech support that I've received. Because of that, I'm going to continue to get the MCUs from the NerdKits Staff!!

Chris B.

April 16, 2009
by ranger
ranger's Avatar

Same here. I could probably save a few cents by buying somewhere else, but these guys are helping the community and I plan on helping them back.

April 16, 2009
by mcai8sh4
mcai8sh4's Avatar

Actually, there's a good point. There seems (to me anyway)to be a few people quite new to this area of technology.

I am completely thick regarding digital electronics. I also have a multimeter, and basically use it to check continuity, check voltages, and little else (occasional resistance type things but not really sure what I'm doing).

May be a quick tutorial on how to use a multimeter on the Nerdkits projects may be a good idea.... simple things like you should get this reading because...

I'll look at the guide that was mentioned (I assume the knowledge would basically apply to all multimeters).

Whilst this wouldn't really help the project per se, it would help debugging problems.

On the subject of helping the Nerdkits staff.. I agree completely! Before I purchased I looked at buying the kit elsewhere to save a few pounds. I even emailed them congratulating them on their business, and mentioned that (due to shipping costs, $/£ exchange...) I was considering buying elsewhere. They replied offering information on installing the bootloader etc. - Almost helping me to buy elsewhere! From that point I knew they where the people to deal with.

I'll certainly support them anyway I can. I'm actually thinking of buying some spares then I can have more than one project on the go at once.

Back on topic though... yeah, us noobs could probably do with a little help on some of the other aspects involved in this technology.

April 27, 2009
by digiassn
digiassn's Avatar

I'd check out some of the books that the Nerdkits staff posted in one of the other topics. The basic electronics books will explain how the basic circuits work, and some will show you how to test circuits using a multimeter for different kinds of faults. Just another one of the great services these guys provide :)

April 29, 2009
by BobaMosfet
BobaMosfet's Avatar

Multi-meter advice. Here are a couple of things to remember when using your multimeter.

  1. Know your load. How much voltage are you going to check for? If you don't know, set your multimeter at its MAXIMUM setting, and adjust downard until the scale is what you want. In some multimeters, if you put too great a load on your meter (like you are expecting < 10VDC, and you get 24VDC, you can blow the diodes in it, ruining it. This will help prevent that.

  2. Zero your meter before testing anything else, by simply touching the leads to one another.

  3. Whenever you test for voltage, AC or DC, the meter is in a passive mode, accepting current and voltage into itself. Whenever you test for continuity (aka resistance/ohms), you are actually generating a small voltage into whatever you are connected to. In other words DO NOT perform continuity/ohm testing on ICs or other components you don't wish to burn up.

Hope that helps.

April 29, 2009
by mcai8sh4
mcai8sh4's Avatar

@BobaMosfet - thanks for the advise, whilst common sense, I must admit, I wouldn't have thought of it - little tips like that are always very useful.

December 14, 2010
by danuke
danuke's Avatar

One thing though, if you are gonna learn tronics with the capacitors and resistors and chokes and all, I recommend that you get a cheap analog meter also. It is really handy for watching trends over time. It's kind of like a picture saves a billion words thing. Not only do you see the arm swing, you can see it change speed and all. Then you can say wow, it the ckt really does what the curve says it does. I call it geeky or nerdy fun.

December 14, 2010
by mongo
mongo's Avatar

Ya gotta learn the theories behind them too. Some times tools are scarce and knowing what to look for to start with can get you through a lot.

January 25, 2011
by Jalex
Jalex's Avatar

I agree as well. I am going to buy more from them too as I don't think I am ready to try to load a blank Mico anyway. I want to support them all I can as well. The manual that came with the nerdkit has answered every question I have had so far and you can't beet a deal like that.

Post a Reply

Please log in to post a reply.

Did you know that you can see each keypress on a computer keyboard on an oscilloscope? Learn more...