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Project Help and Ideas » Connectors

February 10, 2013
by countryguy828
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Just kind of wondering as I think about future projects and such. What do you guys use to connect say power and sensors to your project inside of the project box. I want my projects to be professional looking and possibly be someone weather tight. For instance, I have a 3 conductor sensor, for that I was considering useing a 1/8 inch stero headphone jack. I have another idea that I was considering useing cat5 cable for. Anyone got any pictures of what they have done?

Thank, Dave

February 11, 2013
by Ralphxyz
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The problem with the cat5 cable connectors is that they are so expensive especially if you get a multi port from Radio shack.

I have also been wondering about enclosure port connectors especially to be some what water tight.

Ralph

February 11, 2013
by esoderberg
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Example of RJ45 for LCD connection on my SMD Nerdkit.

SMD Nerdkit NK

RJ45 adapter with contrast control:

RJ45 LCD

February 11, 2013
by Ralphxyz
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Erick, lets see your enclosure. Then what would you do for water tightness/resistance.

I like using the RJ45 I had 4 tempsensors using one socket which worked out well.

Ralph

March 17, 2013
by esoderberg
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I updated my LCD/RJ45 adapter. It only uses one Ethernet cable now. The only drawback is that with only 8 wires in a single RJ45, it didn't allow me to keep the back light on a separate line, so I put a small resistor pad in that can either be populated to default the light on, or left off and use separate lines for the light. I think on my next evolution I'll use another pot (just like the one already used to set the contrast) to set the back-light intensity.

Single cable LCD connection Back side view of LCD with adapter

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