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Project Help and Ideas » Homemade development board with Atmega644PA

April 12, 2012
by kle8309
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Hey guys,

I finally got the chance to build my own development board using a PCB printer in school.

I bought a 5v/3v power supply on ebay for $5 and the atmega644PA for $8 on Mouser.

I have the AVRISP header for direct programming. There are still many more features I would like to add like arduino shield compatibility.

Tell me what you think!

April 12, 2012
by kle8309
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picutre link

April 12, 2012
by kle8309
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2nd picuture

April 12, 2012
by kle8309
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I have recently bought a Pandaboard and it runs on Linux but the logic level on the GPIOs is 1.8v so I will need to using a voltage level translator to convert it to 5v logic. So I plan to use this board to interface with the Pandaboard.

BTW

I used Eagle CAD to design the PCB. Very easy to learn (Youtube tutorials).

April 12, 2012
by pcbolt
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Nice job.

I have a 644 on order right now...along with a RS232 to TTL level converter. I'm trying to integrate two RS232 data streams and record them to a SD card. Sure wish I had a PCB printer for the final board :-)

April 12, 2012
by kle8309
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pcbolt,

You should try etching instead!

Kelvin

April 12, 2012
by pcbolt
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Funny you should mention that. I'm going to be experimenting with a silk screening product from a company called Circuit Bridge. It uses a photo sensitive mesh to create a mask used to paint the copper board before etching. They also make a photo sensitive stencil that I'm going to test to put down solder paste for re-flow. The same mesh material can be used for solder mask and component lettering. I've used the pre-treated photo boards with very good results as well.

Might have some Eagle questions when I get to that stage.

April 13, 2012
by Rick_S
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I think I've pretty much been swayed away from the home board etching. With the inexpensive prototypes I can get now the only advantage doing it at home has is the speed at which you get the board and the reward of that feeling of accomplishment. However, when my boards arrive in the mail that feeling is pretty much there too. I like the fact that I can do double sided with 6 to 8 mil traces with 8 mil spaces between, thru plated vias and holes, laquer coated, and silkscreened for under $20. I can't do any of that at home (at least not easily).

Without the laquer coating, you might want to either run a bead of solder down all your traces or get some tinnit and tin the copper to prevent it from oxydizing.

@pcbolt,

You won't have a problem with eagle. The main problems I've had were remembering how to build a new component that wasn't in a library already. I normally have to research that one each time I do. LOL

Other than that, get the Sparkfun eagle library. They have ton's of common parts in their library so you don't have to search as much to find what you want. I'm sure you've seen the boards I've made in some of my other posts. They were all done with eagle.

Rick

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