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NEW: Learning electronics? Ask your questions on the new Electronics Questions & Answers site hosted by CircuitLab.

Customer Testimonials » CircuitLab

February 28, 2012
by JKITSON
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Thanks for the CircuitLab info in your news letter. This sure would have helped on some of my projects. I will try it soon on a new project I have in mind. Thanks again Jim

February 28, 2012
by pcbolt
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Wow!

You guys have far outdone yourselves this time. Huge kudos on a great achievement.

February 28, 2012
by killercow
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I agree on out doing yourself per pcbolt! I'm liking the custom chip! Now to find time. Kevin - Killercow

February 29, 2012
by esoderberg
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You guys are getting some buzz; CircuitLab showed up on my "What's Hot" G+ stream - all positive comments and nearly a hundred up votes.

March 01, 2012
by Ralphxyz
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I'd sure like to see what the business plan looks like!

I would hope that it becomes advertiser supported or at least payed support before it becomes a subscription service.

It certainly looks great, apparently the "Makedown" web server syntax was not used (Thank God).

Well I guess this explains where Mike has been for the past three months. I was missing his post in the forum and was afraid he might have moved on.

Great job!!

Ralph

March 01, 2012
by hevans
(NerdKits Staff)

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Markdown syntax is actually supported on the CircuitLab forums, and I still use it there too =)

Humberto

March 01, 2012
by Rick_S
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Get the idea that there are some tube heads around. The post with the most replies is requesting tube components. I have some old parts I'm just dying to turn into something... PLEASE Thumbs Up

March 01, 2012
by mongo
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I first started out in tubes back in the 1960's. Car radios even had tubes in them back then. A solid state radio was a new thing and the high end cars had that.

There really are only a handful of different typed but they are made with different gain amounts for a variety of circuits. They also operate at high voltages, which is why I stopped messing with them years ago. Filament heating and the step-up voltage requirements make the power hungry, not to mention the high power components elsewhere in the circuit that need to be there to handle the tubes.

What I would do with tubes is turn them into art work these days, but that's just me. :)

There are a few companies out there that still make tube driven amplifiers and they even prominently display the tubes as part of the appearance. Audiophiles claim that tubes have a warmer tone to their music but there is a price to it too. Personally, when I hear a guitar and a recording of a guitar through a good solid state amp, they sound exactly alike.

I have made art work in the past from these little glass gadgets, like robots and space ships. Just something fun with old obsolete and usually burned out tubes.

Still, you might find tubes in radio transmission equipment and maybe even radar stuff but not too much in the private public.

March 01, 2012
by mrobbins
(NerdKits Staff)

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Hey Ralph, I'm still alive... and spending this evening reading about vacuum tubes :)

March 01, 2012
by JKITSON
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The first computer system I worked on in 1960 (USAF) was total tube. I took 4 each 500KW diesel generators in parallel to run the center and cool the place. Tubes do bring memories tho...

Thanks again to NerdKits for CircuitLab.

Jim

March 02, 2012
by Rick_S
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Tube amplifiers are golden to guitarists. They demand a large price compared to thier solid state counterparts. They get a bit of sag when punched that isn't replicated well in solid state. They tend to have a warmth to their tone. I'm a guitarist wannabe, but I've heard the difference between tube amps vs solid state and I like the tube sound. I have an old tube chassis lying around just waiting to be turned into a usable amplifier. Along that line, anyone know of an inexpensive source for higher voltage capacitors like would go in those amps? Looking for ratings in the 400 - 500 V range.

Rick

March 02, 2012
by pcbolt
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So Mike, does this project qualify as your graduate thesis project? Pretty much demonstrates a mastery of the subject. Kudos again...well done.

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