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Support Forum » Crystal Oscillator

April 09, 2009
by CJS
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Hi, Sorry if this is the wrong place. I was wondering what the part number for the crystal oscillator that comes with the kit was so I can get the data-sheet, and also get more if I need to.

Thanks!

CJS

April 09, 2009
by mrobbins
(NerdKits Staff)

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Hi CJS,

The one we are currently shipping is DigiKey part number 631-1106-ND. You can grab the datasheet as well. Hope that helps!

Mike

June 18, 2009
by BobaMosfet
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When I click their link, it says "Part Not Found". If I copy and past the below link, it works.

http://search.digikey.com/scripts/DkSearch/dksus.dll?Detail&name=631-1106-ND
February 09, 2010
by Phrank916
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Found these recently. They are a pretty good price:

link

February 28, 2010
by BobaMosfet
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Phrank916-

The crystals you found are AT-Cut crystals, not Fundamental like the ones in the NerdKit. They are also not nearly as accurate as the one in the kit.

Here is an interesting capture from my scope of the one from the kit, showing 2ns startup time:

Upper trace is the crystal. Lower trace shows when 5V applied. Note the different voltage scales for each trace.

BM

February 28, 2010
by BobaMosfet
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I meant '2us' (micro) not '2ns' (nano) in the previous post. Sorry about that.-- BM

February 28, 2010
by BobaMosfet
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I think I'm getting old. Not posting any more today. Can't get my mind in gear. Make that 'milli' not micro or nano.... OMG. Yes, I think I know what I'm doing... I'm certain of it.... I think. Maybe....... perhaps? :D

BM

July 20, 2010
by kle8309
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Why do we specifically use the 14.7 MHz? Can we have other oscillators? Anyone

July 20, 2010
by mongo
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The crystals supplied are actually selected for a convenience. By dividing down the frequency we can match the communication rate with the USB adapter with very little special programming. If you build something that does not require communication, you can substitute a different crystal after you upload the programming to the chip. If you want to change the program, just swap it back. I think these MCU's will handle 20 MHZ crystals, maybe higher.

July 29, 2010
by kle8309
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Thanks

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