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Project Help and Ideas » RC Car Schematic?

April 12, 2011
by kirgy
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I'm wanting to start the undertaking of the RC Car project, and am looking for a schematic of the breadboard set-up, but can't seem to find one - it would be really helpful. Is there one available anywhere?

April 12, 2011
by bretm
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There are schematics of the Nerdkits projects here. Is that what you mean?

April 12, 2011
by kirgy
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Theres a project called the iPhone Controlled RC Car which is under the "projects" tab in the websites navigation. http://www.nerdkits.com/videos/rc_car/ I'm looking for a schematic or some kind of layout of the breadboard so I can make the project, but Im unsure where to find it, or figure it out.

April 12, 2011
by bretm
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As far as I can tell, that project uses the standard Nerdkits breadboard setup as described in the Nerdkits guide, plus four switching transistors and associated wires. The schematic for how to connect the switching transistors is included on the project page.

April 12, 2011
by kirgy
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To what extent is the standard layout? There isnt a point in the guide which states something like "use this as a starting template". All ive done so far is largely follow the tutorials in that guide, so to try an understand that layout would be helpful.

Should I have all these in the positions described for the LCD screen?: resister, capacitor, voltage regulator, crystal oscilator, PIC

I've also got the LCD screen hooked up but I guessing I remove that. Ive got the USB hooked up too, and a switch to toggle programing mode.

Is all this (minus the LCD screen)the place to start, then to add those four mofsets and wire it to the external RC controller?

April 14, 2011
by kirgy
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bump

April 14, 2011
by Noter
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The place to start is with simpler tutorials like the led blink, tempsensor, and traffic light demos to get some practice with your nerdkit. They all use the standard nerdkit layout.

April 14, 2011
by bretm
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I would consider the following part of the "standard layout": all GND, VCC, AVCC, AREF pins connected, crystal, reset pin, serial port, and optionally the LCD.

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