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Project Help and Ideas » temp sensor problem

October 18, 2010
by FrankyRizzo
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I am new to programming so please bear with me here. I have been working on the temp. sensor project and I am having some problems with the programming. I have checked for errors at least 10 times and I think that I have it all correct but when I go to cmd and try the make command it take a long time to connect to programmer then it gives me this message: "Found programmer: Id = "FDL v02; type = S software Version = 0.2; No Hardware Version given. avrdude: error: buffered memory access not supported. Maybe it isn't a butterfly/AVR109 but a AVR910 device? make: *** [tempsensor-upload] error1"

PLEASE HELP! :(

October 18, 2010
by FrankyRizzo
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Finally got it to work. Restarted my PC and deleted unsuccessful hex file. Retried programming froze in the middle then once again deleted hex file then next attempt was successful.

October 19, 2010
by Rick_S
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The error message you were getting is a VERY common one. It is usually caused by improper wiring, a bad connection, or the USB adapter not set up properly on the host computer. It comes up when AVRDUDE cannot communicate with the microcontroller. If you search the forum for the words in that error message, you will find a lot of posted possible solutions.

This issue would definately be one for stickies if the forum had them. :)

Rick

PS: Humberto or Mike, If you read this... Since at this time stickies aren't available... have you thought about the possibility of an FAQ or trouble shooting tips link? It could even be a link to a members only section if you chose that way it'd really only be support for your customers.

October 19, 2010
by FrankyRizzo
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Thanks for the input Rick.

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